Category Archives: Christian Faith

As One Who Serves . . .

When I was a kid I had the opportunity to serve for a day as a page with our state representative in the Indiana General Assembly. Looking back on that day, I remember getting a picture taken alongside our state rep and another student from my school, in the Indiana House. I remember running errands, delivering messages, watching the House at work, and getting a tour of the state capitol. But my most vivid memory from the day is that our state representative, himself, picked us up in his car at school, drove us to the state house, went with us to lunch, and gave as a ride home. In other words, this busy, political leader spent a considerable amount of time with a couple of high school kids. He personally invested in our education that day. He repeatedly engaged us in conversation, and listened to what we had to say. He saw to our needs and comfort. He served us – two of his not yet able to vote constituents.

This elected official was respected in our community. He won re-election several times over. He was a public servant in the best understanding of that title. I think of him, and others like him, as our congregation moves into the week of the “Red Letter Challenge” devoted to service.

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Crafting Forgiveness

In his book Embodying Forgiveness author Gregory Jones writes, “forgiveness is a habit that must be practiced over time within the disciplines of Christian community.” He goes on to state, “forgiveness entails unlearning all those things that divide and destroy communion and learning to see and live as forgiven and forgiving people.”* This week, as our congregation explores the theme of “forgiving” in the red letter challenge, I have been drawn back to Jones’ words.

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The Challenge of “Being”

I have often said that among the first steps of discipleship is “learning to be with Jesus”. It is by “being” with Jesus that we become more like him. Attempts to skip over the “being” part of discipleship will result in our “doing” things in our own power and effort – a sure path to disappointment or burnout.

This week in the Red Letter Challenge, a 40 day emphasis we are sharing together at First Baptist – Columbus, our focus is on the words of Jesus that have to do with “being”. Consider just a few of these “being” messages:

“Abide” (dwell/be) in my word.” – John 8:31
“Come to me, all who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” – Matthew 11:28
“Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest for a while.” – Mark 6:31

You’ve probably heard it said that we homo sapiens are misnamed? Instead of being called “human beings” we might better be called “human doings”. But, as we’re learning in the Red Letter Challenge, our doing flows out of our being.

The following faith practices might be helpful as we reconsider how we are “being” with Jesus:

  • Prayer
  • Worship
  • Study
  • Fasting
  • Celebration/Feasting
  • Keeping Sabbath
  • Retreat/Rest

I invite you to join us this Sunday live (9:30 a.m.) or via live stream as we take up the topic “being” and further reflect on Jesus’ words.

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The Danger of Complacency

Author’s Note: This post concludes a 3-post set offered in companionship to a 3-part sermon series I preached in August titled “Distracted”. You can view the series here, as I preach from 3 of John’s 7 Letters to the Churches in Revelation 2 and 3 to talk about the distractions of busyness, the fear of missing out, and complacency. Thanks for reading.

There is an old fable about a frog who was put into a kettle of tepid or lukewarm water. He was quite comfortable in the water and so stayed there. Gradually, however, the water temperature was turned up until it came to a boil. The change was so incremental that the frog did not perceive the danger and he was cooked to death.

Perhaps that fable is an illustration of complacency and the dangers such a condition poses to our faith. The living Christ describes the Church at Laodicea, in Revelation 3:14-22, as “lukewarm”. He wishes they were either hot or cold, but because their spiritual condition is lukewarm, he threatens to spit them out of his mouth. As a coffee drinker I find I can relate to the illustration. I like my coffee hot or cold (iced coffee being a relatively new enjoyment). When it’s lukewarm? No thanks! Yuck! In fact, I think I have spit it back into the cup before.

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The FOMO Distraction

I was recently listening to a podcast (EntreLeadership: Simplify Your Life with Digital Minimalism) on which the presenter, Cal Newport, explained how Social Media apps are designed to promote greater and greater user interface. He used an example of a person who may spend up to six hours per day on their mobile device. Of course this six hours is spread out over a day’s time, built up over many check-ins, viewings and scrolling. But six hours, or even three hours, in one day devoted to one’s phone is a lot! To the point where such usage distracts us from other things in life. These distractions may include our work, our family, and even our faith.

There is a name for this kind of distraction: FOMO – fear of missing out. It’s the fear that keeps us checking FaceBook, Twitter, Instagram and SnapChat to see what our “friends” and “followers” may be doing. It’s the fear that they may be living a life that is much more interesting, or exciting than ours; and that they may be doing it without us!

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